Italy: Wayne in Abruzzo

The Italy: Wayne in Abruzzo program application for 2017/2018 is now closed.
The program application for 2018/2019 will open in September of 2018. 

Spring/Summer 2018: July 11 - August 10 (MUST DEPART FROM U.S. ON or BEFORE JULY 11, TO MEET GROUP AT ROME FCO AIRPORT ON JULY 12)

Italy is truly a modern country, with over 57 million people calling it home. Italians have contributed some of the world's most admired sculptures, paintings, architecture, and composers. It is also home to some of the world's largest and most valuable libraries and art collections. To those who come, it presents a richness of cultural heritage. Italy is an extraordinary opportunity for you to learn its language, experience its culture, and discover its meaning!  Students will embark upon educational and recreational class trips to Rome, Naples, Florence, and Various Cities in Abruzzo.

Located in the Province of L'Aquila of the Abruzzo Region, Gagliano Aterno is a small village of about three hundred inhabitants in the heart of the Abruzzo Region. It is situated along the chain of the central Appenine Mountains in the Sirente Mountain Chain. A peaceful village rich in Abruzzo traditions; history; and archaeology, it houses one of the most important medieval castles, still in use today as a private seasonal retreat for the High Roman Bourgeoisie. Gagliano is located 30 minutes from Sulmona and about one hour from Rome.

In the historical center of the village one finds also a Benedictine monastery, il Monastero di Santa Chiara, dating back to the 13th century A.D. and built on the remains of an early 9th century Benedictine monastery. From the 13th century to the end of the 19th century the monastery was occupied by nuns belonging to the order of the Clarisse. Presently it is occupied and managed by the Ministry of Forest and Wildlife.

Information

Program Fees: $2,500 excludes tuition and airfare 

Please note that you must sign a airfare agreement if you are accepted into the program.

Cost Includes:
Lodging in dorm-type accomodations, 3 meals a day, student visa processing, in-country travel, class trips, laundry, and travel health insurance.

**Please note that the vegetarian menu is rather limited and not comparable to the ordinary menu in Gagliano. Also, students are staying in a 13th century Benedictine Monastery which has no private rooms available.

Scholarship Opportunity:
The Italian Consulate of Detroit invites students of Italian Language majoring or minoring who are planning to participate on the Wayne in Abruzzo Program to apply for an award. The awards range from $500 to $1,000 depending on the quality of application. For more information, click here.

Additional/Excluded Costs:
Meals during excursions, personal expenses, passport processing fees, tuition.

The Office of Study Abroad and Global Programs reserves the right to cancel this program, revise its offerings, or to make any adjustments to the preliminary cost estimates due to conditions beyond its control.

In addition to program cost, students will pay current published fees to WSU for 8 credit hours at the appropriate level through the normal tuition payment process. Students with questions regarding the tuition and fee assessment rate may contact Registration and Scheduling at (313) 577-3541 or view: http://www.classschedule.wayne.edu/

Payment Information:
A deposit of $550 is due within 14 days of acceptance.

The remaining balance is due in three equal payments of $650 on the following dates:

February 27, 2018 $650
March 23, 2018 $650
April 27, 2018 $650

PLEASE READ OUR CANCELLATION AND REFUND POLICIES HERE

Scholarship: Italian Major/Minors Only

Scholarship: Wayne in Abruzzo Accepted Students

Location


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Participants will live in Gagliano Aterno, Abruzzo, Italy. They will also travel to Rome, Naples, and Florence, Italy.

Course work

Academic Focus: Italian

When you study language and culture in Italy, you have the opportunity to explore traditional Italian culture and perfect your language skills through a variety of courses at the beginning, intermediate and advanced levels.

Courses:

ITA 1010 Elementary Italian
ITA 2010 (FC) Intermediate Italian                                            

4 credits
4 credits
*ITA 2710 (CS) Italian Culture and Civilization 3 credits
ITA 3100 Italian Conversation 3 credits
*ITA 5150 Italian Cinema 3 credits
*ITA 5990 Directed Study 1-4 credits
*Courses taught in English  
Courses in other subjects may be added at a later date  
Course Descriptions below  

***Students are required to take 8 credit hours from the following courses. Should a student elect to take two courses from the list above that equals less than 8 credit hours, they MUST register in the directed study course (ITA 5990) for the difference in credit hours.

- Courses taken through the Italian Summer Language Program "Wayne in Abruzzo" will be recorded as Full Immersion Courses inItaly.
- The Department of Romance Language and Literatures of Wayne State University will also grant a Study Certificate to all those students who participate and successfully complete the respective courses in which they enroll through the Italian Summer Language Program.
- Credits are transferable to all institutions (it is however advisable to consult the respective department and institution of affiliation for confirmation of the same).

Faculty:
Dr. Raffaele De Benedictis - Resident Director

Elena Past

Prerequisites and Eligibility:

Undergraduate and graduate Wayne State University students are eligible to participate as well students from other universities and colleges interested in receiving college level credits.

Selection of applicants is done on a rolling basis; students are evaluated and considered for admission throughout the academic year. You will be notified of your acceptance status by the Study Abroad Programs Office. If you wish to participate, you will be required to sign and return the Decision Form and Waiver and Release Statement to accept the terms of the program and secure your place.

ITA 1010 Elementary Italian
Syllabus/Additional Document

The principal aim of the basic course in Italian (ITA 1010-1020-2010) is to develop the student's skills in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing the Italian language. Proficiency in the four skills listed above requires control of the sounds of Italian, mastery of its grammatical structures, and the ability to use and understand many Italian words and idioms. The early weeks of Italian 1010 are devoted primarily to the first of these. At the same time, however, simple grammatical structures are introduced. Eventually, as control of pronunciation is achieved, emphasis shifts to the learning and use of sentence patterns and the building of active vocabulary. 


ITA 2010 Intermediate Italian
Syllabus/Additional Document 

The principal aim of the basic course in Italian (ITA 1010-1020-2010) is to develop the student's skills in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing the Italian language. Proficiency in the four skills listed above requires control of the sounds of Italian, mastery of its grammatical structures, and the ability to use and understand many Italian words and idioms. The early weeks of Italian 1010 are devoted primarily to the first of these. At the same time, however, simple grammatical structures are introduced. Eventually, as control of pronunciation is achieved, emphasis shifts to the learning and use of sentence patterns and the building of active vocabulary. This course fulfills the Foreign Culture Requirement.

ITA 2710 Italian Culture
Syllabus
Italian Civilization I (2710) is developed to provide students with a vehicle for understanding Italy's culture. In particular, this Summer students will be directed through the exploration of the topic of the Italian mafia. Drawing from different sources (essays, movies, fiction, articles), the instructor of this class will explain the history of organized crime in Italy and its influence on the citizens and the country.

ITA 3100 Italian Conversation
Syllabus
An advanced conversation course which is mostly designed for students whom either major or minor in Italian. It surveys contemporary issues on Italian society, politics, education, customs, culture, and lifestyle. While in class, students are encouraged to speak only Italian and imitate their instructor in doing so. Since ITA 3100 is offered in Italy during the Wayne Summer program in Abruzzi, and given the participation of the Università dell'Aquila, the staff in Italian at Wayne University strongly recommends, and certainly has the means to, have such a course taught by a native speaker from the same institution, so that students can greatly benefit from the real contemporary language spoken in Italy, and all its important linguistic nuances that are constantly introduced year after year and commonly used among average native speakers of Italian.

ITA 5150 Italian Cinema
Syllabus 

In the years following World War II, Italian neorealist cinema emerged as an important, politically engaged philosophy of filmmaking that lauded the values of realism and naturalism.  One of its principle proponents, director Vittorio DeSica, declared that the "experience of the war was decisive for us all.  Each felt the mad desire to throw away all the old stories of Italian cinema, to plant the camera in the midst of real life, in the midst of all that struck our astonished eyes." 

Was the cinematic ideal really to be attained by simply planting a cinema camera in a piazza and allowing life to unfold?  In spite of this theoretical passion for direct, scarcely-mediated representations of reality, Italian cinema has always also had a passion for artistry and specifically for the arts.  From lyric opera to architecture, from painting and dance to photography, Italian films have also ingeniously integrated the sister arts into their narratives and their aesthetic programs, using the medium of cinema to study, celebrate, and critique other artistic forms.

This course will consider the rich interdisciplinary potential of cinema by examining the significance of photography, architecture, dance, literature, and music in a wide range of Italian films, from neorealism to the present. How does the cinema camera negotiate its relationship to other art forms? Can film use its study of other aesthetic modes to make important claims about its own status as art?  How might our knowledge of or relationships to the other arts help us to develop new means for understanding film?  We will draw on our own interdisciplinary talents in our quest to unpack the complex artistry that built the films under scrutiny.

Finally, because our course is conducted in Italy, we will also be considering questions of Italian identity, and connecting the films that we view with our own experiences of Italy and Italian art.

ITA 5990 Directed Study

This class involves advanced reading and research under the supervision of a faculty member in an area or areas of Italian Literature, Language, and Culture of special interest to the stud

Apply now

Priority Application Deadline: February 6, 2018

WSU Student Application

WSU Guest Student Application

What happens next?
After you submit your application, transcript, and $50 application fee, we will forward it to the program director (usually the professor leading the program) who makes the final admissions decision. Each program has a slightly different set of criteria. If anything else is required, someone will contact you. After we receive the decision, we will send you a letter informing you of the outcome. If you are admitted, you will have 2 weeks to accept your place and pay your non-refundable deposit.

All correspondence and acceptance will be made by our office via email. Be sure to list an email address that you regularly check on your application. It is your responsibiltiy to make sure you are receiving pertinent documents. If you are worried that your email account is rejecting our email, please contact our office immediately.

For more information, please contact:

The Office of Study Abroad and Global Programs
(313) 577-3207

Dr. Raffaele DeBenedictis
(313) 577-6258